Essential Oil Profile: Dill

Anethum graveolens

IMG_2784

                                                                                     Photo from Fordville

Latin Name: Anethum graveolens  

Family: Apiaceae (Umbelliferae)

Plant Part: Seed

Method: Steam Distilled

Note/Element: Note: Top/Middle. Element: Earth

Functional Groups: Ketone, Terpene

Type: Euphoric, stimulating

Ayurvedic Dosha: Kapha

Scent: Herbaceous, sweet, spicy, fresh, slightly earthy& peppery.

For Skin Type: None

Cautions: Not During Pregnancy or Breastfeeding, Not With Children, HIGH ketone content. May cause skin irritation. Do not take oils internally or use undiluted.

Physical Uses: Indigestion, nausea, vomiting, dry heaves, flatulence, amenorrhea, scanty menstrual flow, colic, anti-fungal.

Mental/Emotional: Apathy, reviving, clearing, tonic, helps with anxiety, tension and anger .

Other Uses: Used mainly in the flavoring industry.

Blends Well With: Fruit, Seed, Spice & Citrus.

Possible Substitutions: Dill weed, Anise, Angelica seed, Caraway seed

References:

Lawless, Julia, The Complete Illustrated Guide to Aromatherapy, Shaftesbury, Dorset, Element Books, 1997.

Katherine Graf:Aroma Studio:Aromatherapy Home Study Certification Master Level, 2001-2011.

https://www.aromaweb.com/essential-oils/dill-oil.asp

https://www.organicfacts.net/health-benefits/essential-oils/dill-essential-oil.html

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24742834

Advertisements

Handmade Soaps by AromaAngie

Hello to all the beautiful people, you know who you are! I have great news, I’m learning to make natural soap. I made my first batch Jan. 25, 2017. A basic recipe lye/lard/water. I added lavender and sweet orange essential oils to scent it. I was so excited. I use the cold process method, I waited 4 long weeks for it to cure. I packaged it, took a million pictures and forgot to put the name of the soap on the labels. I’m off to a great start, right? I love it, I want to make soap every day. Stayed tuned, I have a feeling that this is going to be a very interesting journey, the art and science of making soap. I made a new year resolution about 5 years ago to create my own soap line, I feel so accomplished (sarcasm). I know, the beautiful people would know that. And I have the audacity to call myself a soap maker after making 6 batches since January 25th and launch this new line. I’m claiming it! I feel really good about my new adventure. But I must say before closing if it were not for my hand blender I could not make soap. How did our great-great grandmothers do it? It would take all day. Thanks for shopping at L’s Boutique!

INTRODUCING

Optimized-IMG_2097

Essential Oil Profile: Cypress

Cypress (Cupressus sempervirens)

Latin Name: Cupressus sempervirens

Family: Cupressaceae

Plant Part: Twigs & Needles

Method: Distillation

Note/Element: Note: Middle. element: Water, Metal

Functional Groups: Alcohol, Aldehyde, Ester, Terpene

Type: Relaxing

Ayurvedic Dosha (Balances): Vata, Kapha

Scent: Woody, smoky

For skin Type: Oily

Cautions: Not during pregnancy, Avoid w/ estrogen dependent conditions such as endometriosis, cysts and cancers. Not to use if have high blood pressure.

Physical Uses: Hemorrhoids, perspiration, varicose veins, cellulite, sore muscles, colds, coughs, menstrual and menopausal problems, heavy menstrual flow, bleeding gums, paper cuts.

Mental/Emotional Uses: Strengthening, grounding, grief, stress and tension.

Other Uses: Deodorant, perfumery, styptic

Blends Well With: Needle/Cone, Peel, Seed, Spice, Wood Oils.

Possible Substitutions: Blue Cypress

References:

Lawless, Julia, The Complete Illustrated Guide to Aromatherapy, Shaftesbury, Dorset, Element Books, 1997.

Katherine Graf:Aroma Studio:Aromatherapy Home Study Certification Foundation Level, 2001-2011.

http://oilhealthbenefits.com/cypress-essential-oil/

http://www.anniesremedy.com/chart_remedy.php?rem_ID=26

http://aromaweb.com/essential-oils/cypress-oil.asp

https://draxe.com/cypress-essential-oil/

Essential Oil Profile: Cypress Blue

Blue Cypress(Callitris intratropica)

Latin Name: Callitris intratropica

Family: Cupressaceae

Plant Part: Twigs or Wood

Method: distillation

Note/Element: Note:Top/Middle Element: Wood, Metal

Functional Groups: Terpene, alcohol, lactone and ketone.

Type: Relaxing

ayurvedic dosha (Balances): Pitta

Scent: Sweet, woody, slightly floral, slightly smoky, fruity, notes of lemon and cedar.

For Skin Type: Sensitive

 Cautions: Not during pregnancy.

Physical Uses: Inflammation, warts, burns, rashes, cuts, paper cuts, sore muscles and joints, insect bites, psoriasis, skin moisturizer.

Mental/Emotional Uses: Soothing, centering, balancing and grounding, stress, anger, developing intuition, releases pessimism, helps us to feel empowered,

Other Uses: Insect repellent, men’s aftershave, meditation, dream pillows. Unusual in that this blue oil comes from the wood rather than the flower such as Chamomile blue. Perfume fixative.

Blends Well With: Flower, Fruit, Needle/Cone, Wood, Other  blue oils.

Possible Substitutions: Emerald Cypress(Callitris columellaris), Jade Cypress(Callitris flauca)

 References:

 Katherine Graf:Aroma Studio:Aromatherapy Home Study Certification Advanced Level, 2001-2011.

Lawless, Julia, The Complete Illustrated Guide to Aromatherapy, Shaftesbury ,Dorset,Element Books, 1997.

http://www.edenbotanicals.com/cypress-blue.html

http://aromaweb.com/essential-oils/blue-cypress-oil.asp

http://www.experience-essential-oils.com/blue-cypress-essential-oil.html

For educational purposes only. This information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

coriander seeds

Therapeutic Benefits of Coriander

 Coriander (Coriandrum Sativum)

When I think about coriander the seed of the cilantro plant comes to mind.  Some of the research I read use the two words interchangeably. The Encyclopedia Britannica refers to it as Spanish cilantro. Native to the  Mediterranean and Middle East. Uses go back to Ancient Egypt and China.  “Records of the use of coriander date to 5000 bce (Before Common Era). The seeds are yellowish brown and have a mild, fragrant aroma and aromatic taste similar to a combination of lemon peel and sage. The seeds contain from 0.1 to 1 percent essential oil; its principal component is coriandrol.” (Encyclopedia Britannica)

A clinical study from Germany’s University of Hamburg Medical Center was made and confirmed that an ointment blended with six percent coriander seed oil helps treat athlete’s foot.( Mercola.com)

Fresh cilantro leaves helps to detox heavy metals from the body.

Aphrodisiac– Stimulates sexual desire. Should I say more?

Anti-bacterial and anti-fungal inhibits the growth of bacteria and yeast. Prevents bad breath. Coriander essential oils can reduce infection significantly.

Antimicrobial– Coriander has strong antimicrobial effects against food born pathogens. By adding a little  coriander seeds, powder or cilantro to each meal, you’re protecting yourself and your family against food poisoning.

Carminative and Digestive– Relieves flatulence and stomach aches.

Analgesic– Pain relief. It’s also known to help with urinary treat infections and the pain associated with it.

Stimulant– Makes you more active, gives you more energy.

Anti-spasmodic– Relieves or prevents muscle spasm.

Mental/Emotional Uses- It has a calming effect. Has a spiritual influence. Improves memory. Speeds up healing process, promotes confidence and motivation, promotes feeling of security.

Cautions – Not during pregnancy. Not on sensitive skin. Don’t use coriander essential oil on children under three years old. The whole or powdered seeds in foods are fine.

Latest Research– Studies have shown that coriander has anti-cancer affects – can inhibit heterocyclic amine (HCA) formation in meats during cooking. Reported by The American Journal Clinical Nutrition.  Coriander is  high in carotenoids (antioxidant abilities) , lowers blood sugar according two studies published in the Journal of Food Science. “It works both by enhancing the secretion of insulin from the pancreas and exhibiting insulin-like activity at the cellular level. You can combine two to three drops of coriander essential oil with a carrier oil and put it on the soles of your feet daily”. Researchers say it may prevent neurological inflammation and disease. this super herb also lowers blood pressure and cholesterol. Dr. Axe

Whether you buy the seeds, powder, essential oil( always dilute the oil, consult your local aromatherapist) or fresh cilantro, all forms of this amazing herb has numerous health benefits.

Reference:

Schnaubelt, Kurt, Advanced Aromatherapy: The Science of Essential Oil Therapy,Rochester,Vermont, Healing Arts Press,1998.

Keim-Loughran, Joni & Ruah Bull, Aromatherapy Anointing Oils:Spiritual blessings, Ceremonies & Affirmations, CA, Berkeley , Frog Books, 2001.

https://www.britannica.com/plant/coriander

http://articles.mercola.com/herbal-oils/coriander-seed-oil.aspx

http://www.experience-essential-oils.com/coriander-essential-oil.html

http://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/c/corian99.html

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/299739.php

http://universityhealthnews.com/daily/heart-health/coriander/

https://draxe.com/coriander/